"Every perception is to some degree an act of creation, and every act of memory is to some degree an act of imagination."

-- Gerald Edelman, Second Nature: Brain Science and Human Knowledge
1 Part I: How to remember almost anything: the Anki system3 Part I: How to remember almost anything: the Anki systemPart I: How to remember almost anything: the Anki systemAugmenting Long-term Memory2020-09-24JournalAt first glance, Anki seems nothing more than a computerized flashcard program. You enter a question: And a corresponding answer: Later you'll be asked to review the card: that is, shown the question, and asked whether you know the answer or not. What makes Anki better than conventional flashcards is that it manages the review schedule. If you can answer a question correctly, the time interval between reviews gradually expands. So a one-day gap between reviews becomes two days, then six days, then a fortnight, and so on. The idea is that the information is becoming more firmly embedded in your memory, and so requires less frequent review. But if you ever miss an answer, the schedule resets, and you again have to build up the time interval between reviews.