26 Forgetting of impressions and resolutions26 Forgetting of impressions and resolutions28 Forgetting of impressions and resolutions28 Forgetting of impressions and resolutionsForgetting of impressions and resolutions"Forgetting of impressions and resolutions" by Sigmund Freud28 Forgetting of impressions and resolutions26 Forgetting of impressions and resolutionsWhile writing the latter chapters of my volume on the interpretation of dreams, I happened to be in a summer resort without access to libraries and reference books, so that I was compelled to introduce into the manuscript all kinds of references and citations from memory. These I naturally reserved for future correction. In the chapter on daydreams I thought of the distinguished figure of the poor bookkeeper in Alphonse Daudet’s Nabab, through whom the author probably described his own day-dreams. I imagined that I distinctly remembered one fantasy of this man, whom I called Mr. Jocelyn, which he hatched while walking the streets of Paris, and I began to reproduce it from memory. This fantasy described how Mr. Jocelyn boldly hurled himself at a runaway horse and brought it to a standstill; how the carriage door opened and a great personage stepped from the coupe, pressed Mr. Jocelyn’s hand and said: “You are my savior—I owe my life to you! What can I do for you?” Continue reading…