6 Halfway Through Gary Vaynerchuk’s ‘Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook,’ Here’s What I’ve Learned | by Tanner Hunt | MediumHalfway Through Gary Vaynerchuk’s ‘Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook,’ Here’s What I’ve Learned | by Tanner Hunt | Medium1. What’s needed is less ‘right-hooking’ and more ‘jabbing’2020-10-07Journal1. What’s needed is less ‘right-hooking’ and more ‘jabbing’2. Most brands still don’t understand social media, so most of their content really sucks3. Facebook, despite its popularity, is still one of the least understood social platforms4. It’s all about brevity and super-micro-content5. Content may be King, but context is God6. Brands are fatally thinking of social media as a distribution channel rather than a storytelling channelOne week ago I received my copy of Gary Vaynerchuk’s Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook from Amazon. The book is aptly subtitled “How to tell your story in a noisy social world” and clearly explains how brands (and individuals) can cut through the clutter on social media with creative and powerful content. After finishing the book today I knew I wanted to blog about some of the things I learned and the new thoughts and ideas it inspired in me. So I sat down and decided to write a list of some of the most important things I got from it that I could share in a post like this one. I meant to only write down 10 or so lessons, but before I knew it, my list quickly grew to more than forty. JJJRH is just full of powerful insight that is easy to digest and simple to understand for marketers at any level. Over time, I’ll probably end up writing a fair amount about it all, but in this post I’ll share just 6 takeaways I had upon finishing JJJRH. The list isn’t intended to be organized in order of importance, since that may vary depending on the needs of the reader, nor is it my “top 6" lessons from the book overall. It’s just a few nuggets of social media marketing wisdom that hopefully inspire you to make some positive changes. Continue reading… Index 1. What’s needed is less ‘right-hooking’ and more ‘jabbing’ 2. Most brands still don’t understand social media, so most of their content really sucks 3. Facebook, despite its popularity, is still one of the least understood social platforms 4. It’s all about brevity and super-micro-content 5. Content may be King, but context is God 6. Brands are fatally thinking of social media as a distribution channel rather than a storytelling channel Continue reading… (Original article)