"Every perception is to some degree an act of creation, and every act of memory is to some degree an act of imagination."

-- Gerald Edelman, Second Nature: Brain Science and Human Knowledge
How to best help users when they forget the answer to a question?1 How to encode stories in the mnemonic medium?Improving the mnemonic medium: making better cardsHow can we develop transformative tools for thought?2020-10-18Journal1 How to encode stories in the mnemonic medium?2 How to encode stories in the mnemonic medium?3 How to encode stories in the mnemonic medium?4 How to encode stories in the mnemonic medium?5 How to encode stories in the mnemonic medium? How to encode stories in the mnemonic medium? People often find certain ideas most compelling in story form. Here's a short, fun example: did you know that Steve Jobs actively opposed the development of the App Store in the early days of the iPhone? It was instead championed by another executive at Apple, Scott Forstall. Such a story carries a force not carried by declarative facts alone. It's one thing to know in the abstract that even the visionaries behind new technologies often fail to see many of their uses. It's quite another to hear of Steve Jobs arguing with Scott Forstall against what is today a major use of a technology Jobs is credited with inventing. Can the mnemonic medium be used to help people internalize such stories? To do so would likely violate the principle of atomicity, since good stories are rarely atomic (though this particular example comes close). Nonetheless, the benefits of such stories seem well worth violating atomicity, if they can be encoded in the cards effectively. Continue reading… Index 1 How to encode stories in the mnemonic medium? 2 How to encode stories in the mnemonic medium? 3 How to encode stories in the mnemonic medium? 4 How to encode stories in the mnemonic medium? 5 How to encode stories in the mnemonic medium? Continue reading…