"Every perception is to some degree an act of creation, and every act of memory is to some degree an act of imagination."

-- Gerald Edelman, Second Nature: Brain Science and Human Knowledge
2 Of Heate - Cold.1 Of violent MotionThe Newton Project Knowledge Graph2020-10-08Journal1 Of violent MotionViolent motion is continued either by the aire or by force imprest. or by the naturall gravity in the body moved. Not by the aire since the aire crowds more uppon the thing projected before, than behind, as must therefore rather hinder it for you may Figure observe in water that a thing moved in it doth carry the same water behind it along with it as in a cone or at least Figure the water is moved from behind it with but a small force as you may observe by the motes in the water supose (a) to be the boddy moved: (b. d. e. f) to be the water moving behind (a) to give it place. (r) the water behind (a) following it & going along with it. The{n} if the water at (f) ran so violently against the backsid of (a) it would beate away the water at (r) with violence but that water is moved very slowly from behind a. if it be moved away: as you may perceive by the motes in the water. the like must hapen in aire if you say no I answer must then move (a) forwards in water. So if hot leade drop into water that parte which is behind will be pointed the fore parte round which would be otherwise if the aire pressed as much on it behind as before. thirdly how can the aire continue the motion of a globe on its axis. Fourthly in the former figure the aire is supposed to have the same propensity to motion which the ball (a) is supposed to have that is will move no longer than it is propelled on. then I say the water at (r) cannot move the ball unles the ball do at the same time move (b) that (b) may (g) & (h) & (g) may move (d) & (d) move (i) & (i) move (f) & f move r & force it to rush uppon the ball & consequently at the same instant (r) must the ball, & the ball move (r) which cannot be. But suppose the aire & the ball were detained from motion by some outward agent, & yet kept the same respect to one-another in situation as they did in theire flight: then as soon as they were both let loose againe the aire would have as much power to move the ball as it had when they were in theire former flight: If it be answered that the aire will be more compressed at (f) than at (b) & consequently when let loose againe it will dilate it self & so begin a new motion. I answer how comes the aire to be more crouded behind the ball then before since (a) will communicate as much force on (b) as it receives from r & the fore parte of the aire will croud no more on the latter parts than the ball will croud on it. Againe whence is it that a peice of leade will move farther & with more force than a peice of wood of the same bignesse since the aire will have the same influence on both. Continue reading… Index 1 Of violent Motion Continue reading…